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comics in wartime propaganda

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WWII

Reconciliation through Art… (Spiegelman, that is)

In contrast to cultural history that draws on high art that is largely inaccessible to the masses and provides only encapsulated excerpts, Scott (2011) describes that “… popular cultural history draws on a broader base of materials and a more complete record, especially for the past two centuries (a period roughly coterminous with the existence of the United States of America). Thus, as historical subjects get closer to the present and the depth and breadth of evidence expands, it is increasingly possible to write history that reconstructs the mental universe in which ordinary people lived.”

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One chief, two chief, east and west chief…

I could not finish this assignment without taking a quick look at my beloved Dr. Seuss (Theodor Seuss Geisel) and his contributions to WWII propaganda.

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Marvels in the war theatre

During the inter-war years between WWI and WWII, comic books resumed their role as an entertainment medium, offering escapism and adventure stories (Scott, 2011). Among other things, comic books helped in reconciling the WWI experience for children, youth and young adults who either lived through it or were experiencing its inter-generational latter effects via in their upbringing by parents/families who lived through it (Chapman, 2014; Scott, 2011).

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がんばっ! 戦争での漫画

WWI and WWII offered Japan a vehicle for imperial expansion to other parts of Asia through military conquest. Critical to these pursuits were conquering the minds and hearts of Japanese citizens, including children who represented the future of the empire, and undermining enemy morale (Aoki, 2016; Kennedy, 2007; Manga, 2016). Early manga used in propaganda was an effective medium.

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