In contrast to cultural history that draws on high art that is largely inaccessible to the masses and provides only encapsulated excerpts, Scott (2011) describes that “… popular cultural history draws on a broader base of materials and a more complete record, especially for the past two centuries (a period roughly coterminous with the existence of the United States of America). Thus, as historical subjects get closer to the present and the depth and breadth of evidence expands, it is increasingly possible to write history that reconstructs the mental universe in which ordinary people lived.”

Continue reading “Reconciliation through Art… (Spiegelman, that is)”